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The eNewsletter articles on this page provide valuable information on timely and interesting financial issues across a variety of subject areas, including retirement, investments, personal finance, annuities, insurance, taxes, college, and government benefits.


Mergers & Acquisitions: What's in the Deal for Investors?
How Does the Federal Reserve Affect the Economy?
How to Recover from a Mid-Life Financial Crisis
What is a college income-share agreement?
How much money should a family borrow for college?


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What is a college income-share agreement?

A college income-share agreement, or ISA, is a contract between a student and a college where a student receives education funding from the college today in exchange for agreeing to pay a percentage of future earnings to the college for a specified period of time after graduation. The idea behind ISAs is to minimize the need for private student loans, to give colleges a stake in their students' outcomes, and to give students the flexibility to pursue careers in lower-paying fields.

Purdue University was the first college to introduce such a program in 2016. Under Purdue's ISA program, students who exhaust federal loans can fund their education by paying back a share of their future income, typically between 3% to 4% for up to 10 years after graduation, with repayment capped at 2.5 times the initial funding amount.1

A handful of other colleges also offer ISAs; terms and eligibility requirements vary among schools.

ISAs are considered friendlier than private student loans because they don't charge interest, and monthly payments are based on a student's income. Typically, ISAs have a minimum income threshold, which means that no payment is due if a student's income falls below a certain salary level, and a payment cap, which is the maximum amount a student must pay back relative to the initial funding amount. For example, a payment cap of 1.5 means that a student will pay back only 1.5 times the initial funding amount. Even with a payment cap, a student's payment obligation ends after the stated fixed period of time, regardless of whether he or she has fully paid back the initial loan.

1 U.S. News & World Report, September 26, 2018
 
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Jon Ten Haagen is an Investment Advisor Representative offering securities and advisory services offered through Royal Alliance Associates, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC and a registered investment advisor. Ten Haagen Financial Group is not affiliated with Royal Alliance Associates, Inc. or registered as a broker dealer or investment advisor.

Dated material presented here is available for historical and archival purposes only and may not represent the current market environment.  Dated material should not be used to make investment decisions or be construed directly or indirectly, as an offer to buy or sell any securities mentioned. Past performance cannot guarantee future results.



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